Filtering by Category: Loro KAL

May Reset

Is anyone else feeling like it's New Year's Day all over again? Spring is kind of a moody slog for most of us, and I am definitely ready to shake off that feeling. Before moving forward though, I'd like to thank Fringe Association again for choosing my L'Arbre Hat pattern for their second Hatalong. I decided to join in and knit one using Zealana Yarns Kauri. I blog for Zealana as well and you can read my post on yarn selection here

I used a really clever 1 x 1 Ribbing cast-on that I learned from my friend and mentor Norah Gaughan. You can see her use it in her Creativebug Cabled Hat Class. I've also done some Creativebug classes if you're looking for a new project. I knit the ribbing on a US size 6, a common technique that somehow didn't make it into this pattern (you'll see that mistakes are a theme with this one...) 

I started my hat with Zealana Kauri K13 Ashen, a lovely dove gray-blue. I often knit in the semi-dark while watching movies or television and...well, when I ran out of yarn, I accidentally grabbed K01 Natural to finish the crown shaping. When I noticed my error in daylight, I actually decided that I really loved the subtle colorblocked effect. While I was knitting the last few rows I discovered ANOTHER tiny error (sigh): Rnd 1 of the crown shaping should read *K1, s2kp2, k1, p3..." to maintain the garter pattern. I also worked Rnd 14 as ssks because I thought it looked better than the k2tog I originally called for. WTH, past me? 

You might not know this but patterns for books and magazines are tech edited, but usually not test knit. Test knitting is a relatively new phenomenon in the knitwear design world, most commonly used by indie designers. Knitting up this hat showed me the value of test knitting, and while it's often not possible within the time constraints of traditional publishing, it's clearly a valuable process. 

Moving on to new business! It's been a busy year for me so far, but most of the work is sadly behind the scenes, to be revealed later this year. Much of it forced me to set aside fun projects like the Loro KAL. A handful of really great Loros have been finished, and I'm hoping to get mine done in the next few weeks as well, in time for TNNA. I've decided to work a cropped version (read more here), so I feel like that's a reasonable goal.  Fingers crossed!...

XO CR

LOROMAS

Hi everyone, happy solstice, and merry LOROMAS! If you're knitting along with me, you're probably puttering along on the back, somewhat bored of the massive moss stitch landscape you're creating. Don't forget to follow my favorite knitting advice from Maggie Righetti

Stop often and admire your work.

This is where you'll catch your dumb mistakes, but it's also where you'll feel that awesome sense of pride, and pure enjoyment as you revel in your chosen materials. Or maybe you'll decide you need to switch gears entirely. Better to realize that now, no? I love Maggie. 

While we settle into the busiest bit of the holiday season, I thought I'd share a few Loro related treats. The first is the namesake for the comforting sweater that's hardly more than a scarf. Loro by Pinback is one of my favorite songs. It's thought-provoking, rhythmic and dreamy all at once, qualities I felt while working on the vest. This is a fan-made video, by the by, but you can find much more Loro on Spotify and the like. 

Bonus! Here are some images that were on my mood board while I designed the pieces for the Homebodies chapter of my book. Keywords were languid, warm and (ever-so-slightly) coquettish. 

Have a lovely holiday season, home-bound or otherwise! 

XO CR

Loro KAL | Casting-On + Making Mods

Hello! We're ready to cast-on for Loro! If you're been following along so far, you'll know that I swatched five yarns in preparation for today. I forgot to mention that I picked up four of them at Tolt Yarn and Wool, my semi-local LYS (Cascade Ecological Wool, Madeline Tosh Vintage, Peace Fleece Worsted, and Quince & Co. Osprey Heathers). They should all be available online soon, or you can call and place an order over the phone. I've decided to use Zealana Tui, a soft single-ply which is slightly too heavy at 3 stitches to the inch knit on size 9 needles. Lucky me, as Zealana's Brand Ambassador I was able to get this gloriously fluffy possum/merino/cashmere blend on a cone, meaning I'll have very few yarn ends to weave in (truth be told, I swear by spit-splicing, so I rarely have many ends). 

The fabric on 9s is already rather firm, and to get to the stated gauge of 4 stitches to the inch, I'd have to drop at least a needle size, which would probably yield a cardboard-like fabric. I decided to do a bit of tinkering on my calculator, coming up with a new cast-on number that would work with my gauge. It was very easy, and I'll walk you through what I did in case you're having trouble getting gauge, or, like me, you fancy yourself a rebel.

Oh! One more note: in my last post I said that matching row gauge isn't all that important and that's not exactly true. I'm shortening my vest, and since the pattern calls for decreases every 12 rows (approximately every 2"), I needed to figure out how many decreases will be eliminated in the shortened version so I can adjust my stitch count accordingly. 

I'll be knitting a medium, which measures 21.5" across at the lower hem. The medium back as written is 29" long and I'd like to shorten my vest to about 21", which means eliminating 4 decreases. First, I need to find my new cast-on number. I know that the original back measures 21.5" across at lower hem, so I multiply this number by my new gauge and get 64.5. I need a whole, even number to work Moss Stitch and the built-in garter selvedge, so I round down to 64. I subtract the decreases I'm omitting and get 60. This is my new cast-on number. I'll cast on 60 and proceed with the pattern as written. 

Leaving a 16-18" tail of yarn when casting-on is a great way to facilitate neat seaming later, but that long tail can get in your way while you're knitting. I wind it into a small bundle called a yarn butterfly, a technique that can also be used in lieu of bobbins when working intarsia. The whole process is pictured below: 

Good luck with your cast-on! Let me know if you have any questions, or if you're making any mods of your own. Comment here or in our Loro KAL Ravelry thread, and be sure to hashtag #LoroKAL on Twitter and Instagram so we can all keep tabs on each other's progress. Have fun!

XO CR

all text and images © cirilia rose 2017